The sun was out, and I brought the film gear.  Today was all 35mm, no digital.  

Here are some of my favorites from the parade (haven't posted the slide pictures yet, though). 
I hope you like the pictures as much as I do.


Kodak Ultra Max 400
35mm


There are reasons I prefer film, and I think at least one of them shows in the photos.  Film has "ambience", mood.  That's also why I don't adjust out the color casts or sharpen up the pictures too much.  (I finally decided to go through and sharpen some of these, though, because I found the scanner wasn't focusing quite where it should have...)

A digital camera can capture an electronic snapshot of what it sees, but it's cold and computerized.  With enhancement, digital can imitate film (rather imperfectly), but you have to figure in the cost of the time required to do that.  For more than a couple photos, it adds up.  And at the end, it's still not the real thing. 

Speaking of the real thing, it is very moving to see and hear these pipers marching down the street.  What a powerful way to honor those who gave their lives for our great nation.  They really are "one sound" when they play.  



Ultra Max 400


By the way, I had the developed negatives in hand by the day after the event.  If I hadn't been so tired from the heat, I could probably have had them that same afternoon.   The supposed time advantage of digital is really just imaginary, unless you're needing to work on time scales of minutes or a couple hours. 


Ultramax 400


Everybody knows you can't have a real American parade without tractors.   Big, red tractors, made in the USA.   Rollin' on down the street with American flags.

Don't forget people riding in the backs of old trucks and cars, too. 



Ultramax 400


I love a parade. 



(I like that Model T Ford a lot, too.)



Ultramax 400


Most serious digital photogs carry a spare digital back.  That's their backup unit.  My backup is a $25 travel camera made in the 60's and 70's.  (That writing on it is in Russian, in case you're wondering).

It has a wide-angle lens.  It has no light meter.  You have to estimate the focus.  It only uses half the frame, so the pictures are extra-grainy.  It is about as far opposite from digital photography as you can get. 

And it's good.





Fuji Superia 100
(expired)
35mm half-frame


It still takes good pictures 40 years later, if you know what you're doing.  I've gotten pretty good at guesstimating the settings on this little camera.

"Guesstimating?  Forty year old cameras?  What kind of photographer are you?"   

...

One thing I enjoy about film cameras is that different ones yield slightly different "looks".  This becomes even more true when you can choose from different types and brands of film. 

Here's a picture I really like.  Parades need to have horses;  preferably big, powerful draft horses.   This is America.



Fuji Superia 100
(expired)
35mm half-frame



Most of the pictures with my "backup cam" were f/11 at 125th.   I had it set on the hyperfocal distance for most of them. 




Fuji Superia 100
(expired)
35mm half-frame


The parade, and everyone else, ended up at the park.  There, under the shade of a big tree, I found the pipers with their gear.  We had strolled in a little late, having taken a break to get some lunch right after the parade.  (I wonder if they were playing at the ceremony, which we missed.)

I used the SLR for the main group shot, but the half-frame 35mm pic came out pretty well.  It has that "vintage" look, for certain.  In case you're wondering, I'm reasonably sure it was f/8 at 1/60th. 

Anyway, these guys were awesome in the parade.  Picture taken with Russian half-frame camera:



Fuji Superia 100
(expired)
35mm half-frame


Really nice folks, and they're great at what they do.   

(There's a full-frame 35mm photo of the same group in the slide show on the home page.  It was taken with Kodak 400.) 

The day was drawing to a close now.  It must have been ninety degrees out that afternoon, so it was fitting they should have a water balloon toss:



Fuji Superia 100
(expired)
35mm half-frame


Well, that about wraps it up for the festivities.  

It was a good day.



Thanks for visiting this site.  I hope you enjoy my work.






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