Canon SX50 Gallery

Page 3
August 21, 2014

Most of my work is on film (here's why), but lately I've also been using the Canon PowerShot SX50 HS.  I've reviewed it extensively here. 


The Canon SX50 HS
August 2014

All photos on this website are Copyrighted
 



The Canon SX50, like most compacts, produces photos in a 3:4 aspect ratio.  You can change that setting, but usually I just leave it be.  The closest standard print size would be 8x10 or 11x14;  some of the picture will be cut off even there. The correct dimension would be 9x12.  
Most of these photos have had some basic adjustments, such as curves, brightness-contrast, etc.  This is normal and customary for digital photos, at least with advanced photographers.  That's why the pictures you see in the camera brochures rarely look the same as what you get "right out of the box".  It's just very basic post processing

OK, time for some pictures.


Supermoon 9th August 2014


Supermoon 9th August 2014

Photo taken August 9, 2014
Canon SX50
ISO 200
f/6.5 @ 1/400th second
Zoom 215mm  (equivalent to 1200mm) + 2x digital zoom
Some post-processing



The moon was in perigee on the weekend of August 9th-10th, 2014.  That means it was at its closest orbital approach to earth.  What a difference that made in the apparent size!  The supermoon looked so big that it almost hit the edges of the frame when I zoomed in with the Canon SX50.   Tripod required, of course. 

This was just after 9 PM, before the moon had risen very high in the sky.  If I'd gotten a better vantage point, I probably could have gotten it earlier and had an even larger moon.




A Conversation of Saffron Producers




A Conversation of Saffron Producers

Canon SX50
This was straight from camera, shot in either P or V color mode.


Some croci having deep purple coloration.  Or perhaps a conversation.



Cows In the Queen Anne's Lace


Cows In the Queen Anne's Lace

Photo taken August 10, 2014
Canon SX50
Auto ISO @ 800
Tripod
f/6.5 @ 1/100th
Zoom:  215mm (equivalent to 1200mm)


A pair of Rocky Mountain Elk cows.  I took this photo at 7:56 PM, just before sundown.

With the background blurred this much on a small-sensor camera like the SX50, you know I had to be zoomed in pretty far.  At 1200mm equivalent, you definitely need a tripod.  This was not an easy shot to get, because small-sensor bridge cameras are only good up through about ISO 800.  A couple minutes after this picture, the shutter speeds were too slow to get clear pictures.  The slightest movements of these animals would cause blurring. 

It's remarkable that such good image quality can be obtained from such a small sensor, but as I've noted before, the SX50 is very good up through ISO 800. 

The biggest advantage is that all this zoom power costs a fraction of what it would cost with a DSLR.  Go ahead and price it out;  even a 400mm prime lens is at least three times what the Canon SX50 costs.  Bigger focal lengths go up from there.   You could get the cheap Opteka, but from what I've seen, the SX50 does much better.  Look at the elk photo again, or the supermoon.  There's no way the Opteka is going to beat that.  

One more thing... I couldn't have gotten this shot with one of the new 1" sensor bridge cameras, because they max out around 300mm zoom-equivalent.   The SX50 goes all the way out to 1200mm equivalent, which still ranks it among the best.  Then it adds an actually-pretty-good 2x digital zoom on top of that. 



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I have a more in-depth review of the Canon SX50 available here.



White Birch, Green Forest


White Birch, Green Forest

August 2014
Canon SX50
Auto ISO @ 800
f/5.6 @ 1/125th
Zoom:  38.7mm (equivalent to   mm)
"P" (Color Positive) mode

No adjustments


A white birch tree. 

This was not zoomed all the way in, but there's still some mild background blurring.   For a while I didn't think this was even possible with a 1/2.3" sensor, but there's just enough of it that the birch tree stands out a bit from the surroundings.  It just goes to show:  there are some landscape situations where you don't want everything to be in ultra-sharp focus.



Parthenocissus quinquefolia


Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Canon SX50
Auto ISO 800
f/5.6 @ 1/30th
Zoom:  41.9mm (233mm equivalent)
"P" (color positive) mode

No adjustments


Virginia creeper can be easy to mistake for poison ivy.  Mainly, that happens farther down a vine toward the ground, where the leaves are often not fully unfurled.  You'll see only three out of the five leaves.
Thing is, though, you have to watch out... poison ivy vines often do grow alongside Virginia creeper.   And they don't always have noticeable leaves on them.  Leaves or not, you can get poison ivy anyway.  (Voice of experience here...)

This picture was zoomed in quite far to be using 1/30th of a second, handheld.  This camera has very good image stabilization. 

Here again:  a slight bit of background blurring makes the subject stand out a bit.



Distant Fireworks


Distant Fireworks

Canon SX50
ISO 80
f/5.6 @ 4 seconds
Tripod
Focal length:  51.9 mm (290mm equivalent)

Saturation adjustments & unsharp masking


This display was far away.  Many of the bursts were going off at different heights.  To get a frame-filling picture, this had to be cropped down to about 3.6 megapixels.  Still looks good to me!  (This article talks about some limitations for photographing fireworks.  You can occassionally get some nice results, though.)

Though the SX50 is sometimes called a "point and shoot", it's really more advanced than that.  It's easy to take great pictures without doing much, but it's also got manual settings for the more advanced uses.  For fireworks this wouldn't be my main camera, but for daytime scenery it's A-OK.

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Thanks again for reading!






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