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Ilford HP5 Plus 400 at EI 12800

A Gallery

April 2016



Here are a few pictures from a roll of Ilford HP5 Plus 400, shot and developed at EI 12800

For the Ilford shoot, I stopped using the in-camera light meter that kept getting everything wrong.  Instead, I used one of the methods outlined in this article.

Development was in Kodak HC-110 Dilution B for 44 minutes at 68 to 70 Fahrenheit.  Agitation for first 30 seconds, followed by 10 seconds every 5 minutes.  This may be closer to 6400 than 12800, but at these high EI values, Ilford HP5+ 400 may have as much as a one-stop advantage over Tri-X in HC110 Dilution B.

See also Pushing Ilford HP5+ To 6400 And Beyond.  For beginners, see How To Develop B&W Film




Light Bulbs

April 2016 Ilford HP5 Plus at 12800
f/8
1/125th sec. handheld


With the short focal distance here, it probably would have been better to use f/11 and a 60th. 

When I shot this scene on 35mm, the result was very different, for a couple reasons.






Convenience Store

April 2016 Ilford HP5 Plus at 12800
f/8
1/125th sec. handheld

This was still probably 1/2 stop underexposed.  Were I to bracket (like you're supposed to do), I'd have tried this also at f/9.5 @ 60th, and maybe f/8 @ 60th.  Or, instead, I'll just use that setting and get it right the first time on a whole new roll o' film.  Half a stop over is no big deal for negative film, so f/8 @ 60th should be quite good for this scene.

As it is, though, consider that you're looking at film pushed way beyond the design parameters.  For what we have here, I think this is pretty darned good. 





Gas Station

April 2016 Ilford HP5 Plus at 12800
f/8
1/125th sec. handheld

It's possible this was f/11 at a 60th instead, but it would be the same EV.



Restaurant

April 2016 Ilford HP5 Plus at 12800
f/8
1/125th sec. handheld

This one actually might have been f/8 at 1/60th, but I'd like to try this one a stop brighter.  Sometimes, due to sheer laziness or haste, I don't bother to bracket.  Also I like to get a variety of scenes on a roll of film, instead of bracketing where I'd have 3 or 5 pictures of the same thing.  If you haven't dialed in your settings, though, bracketing will help you get there.  For night photography you really should bracket until you figure that out, because a TTL light meter won't help much. 

I like this building because it preserves the familiar lines of the 1970's.  Many of the older buildings are either gone or they have been renovated to look brand-new. One nice thing about this restaurant chain is that they often keep the original designs.  Whether you like their food or don't, the buildings are a type of roadside Americana.

Time to develop some more film;  if I get the chance I'll scan a couple more off this roll of Ilford HP5.




That concludes this gallery, for now.  Thanks for reading!





You might also like...

Gallery:  Kodak Tri-X At 6400

How-To:  Pushing Tri-X To 6400 And Beyond



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